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How Can We Get Along Better?

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Public Faith in a Pluralistic Society

Christians often talk about the common good but find it difficult to pursue it in a world of competing voices. Miroslav Volf claims the confusion stems from misunderstandings about human flourishing, abundant living and co-existing alongside adherents of other faiths. He explains how pursuing the common good in a pluralistic

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Where Muslims and Christians Agree

It's one thing to talk about crossing the dividing lines of religion, but can that actually happen? How can people of two different faiths work together for the common good? The relationship between Sheikh Mohammed, Judge of Sidon in Lebanon, and Martin Accad, a Christian pastor in the Middle East,

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Confident Pluralism

America wasn’t meant to be homogeneous. A bedrock principle of our nation is its ability to accommodate diverse beliefs and practices, but this is challenging and citizens of the U.S. are more polarized than ever. Professor and author John Inazu thinks that we can live together peacefully and

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Race And America

The #blacklivesmatter movement receives mixed reception in culture and especially among Evangelical Christians. While some contend “all lives matter,” others recognize the special focus needed on to the continued struggle of being black in America. Michelle Higgins is an organizer and speaker who is on the front lines of the

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Principled Pluralism

From debates about the hiring practices of churches to rumors of community adherence to Sharia law, Americans have long been facing questions regarding the role of various religions in public life. As our nation grows increasingly diverse, can we coexist without compromising those principles we hold dear? Gideon Strauss says

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Known By Our Gratitude

One of the most powerful virtues in our society, is also one of our least known virtues: gratitude. Gratitude is the key to not only experiencing what communities want, an authentic, thriving joy — but is what Chesterton called the highest form of thinking. Thinking that is bedrock foundational to healthy

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Unlikely Allies

We’ve been drawing religious lines in the sand for hundreds of years, using varying standards to determine who’s “in” and who’s “out.” How can Christians work for peace within culture if we can’t get it right amongst ourselves? Ted Trimpa, gay rights activist, and Jim Daly,

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Announcing Q 2017